Why Can’t Global Diplomacy or International Law Cannot Stop War in Ukraine?

The ongoing war in Ukraine has been one of the most significant geopolitical challenges of the 21st century. It has drawn international attention as a major threat to global security. Putin’s relentless quest for power, coupled with his ruthless disregard for the lives of innocent civilians, has resulted in catastrophic consequences for those trapped in the midst of the ongoing war. His callous willingness to inflict harm upon others, no matter the cost, is a brutal reminder of the extent to which he will go to assert his dominance. The legacy of this conflict will be a lifetime of pain and suffering for countless individuals, as they bear the deep and lasting scars of the violence and destruction wrought by Putin’s insatiable thirst for power. Despite diplomatic efforts and international laws, the war in Ukraine continues to escalate, and there seems to be no end in sight. The question that arises is why global diplomacy or international law cannot stop war in Ukraine?

One of the key reasons behind this is Putin’s imperialistic agenda. Putin’s regime has been expanding Russia’s influence beyond its borders, creating an illusion of Russian superiority over its neighboring countries. As pointed out by the Wilson Center[1], Putin’s imperial ambitions have come at a high cost, including a failing economy, increasing poverty, and international sanctions. Putin’s aggression towards Ukraine is not just a political move but also a way to consolidate his power at home by portraying himself as a strong leader.

The cruelty inflicted on the Ukrainian people by Russian forces is another factor that has made diplomatic efforts ineffective. The Harvard Gazette[2] reports that the fighting in Ukraine has intensified, committing atrocities, including torture, sexual violence, and extrajudicial killings. Such brutality has fueled resentment and hatred among the Ukrainian people, making it almost impossible to find a peaceful solution through diplomatic means.

Furthermore, the historical context of the conflict adds another layer of complexity to the situation. Ukraine has been a battleground for centuries, with different empires vying for control over its territory. Ukraine’s strategic location and fertile land have made it a valuable asset for its neighbors, explains the IAI publication[3]. The history of conquest and subjugation has created a deep-seated mistrust between Ukraine and Russia, making it difficult to resolve the conflict through diplomacy.

Despite these challenges, the international community has made concerted efforts to stop the war in Ukraine through diplomatic means and international laws. As stated by the European External Action Service[4], the EU has consistently condemned Russia’s aggression towards Ukraine and imposed economic sanctions to deter further military action. The United Nations has also passed several resolutions, calling for an end to the violence and respect for international law. Moreover, the conflict in Ukraine has also tested the international legal order. As noted by the Brookings Institution[5], Russia’s annexation of Crimea was a clear violation of international law. However, the lack of a strong international response to this violation has emboldened Russia to continue its aggressive actions in Ukraine. This highlights the need for stronger international institutions and legal frameworks to prevent similar violations in the future.

However, the effectiveness of these efforts has been limited, as Russia has largely ignored international laws and diplomatic overtures. Stanford Law School’s Allen Weiner[6] points out that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine violates several principles of international law, including the prohibition of the use of force and the respect for territorial integrity. Despite the condemnation of the international community, Russia has continued its military campaign, undermining the authority of international laws and institutions.

Additionally, Putin’s propaganda has also played a significant role in the conflict. The Rand Corporation[7] claims that Putin has used propaganda to shape public opinion in Russia and to justify his actions in Ukraine. Putin’s propaganda machine has been highly effective, leading many Russians to believe that Putin’s leadership is essential for Russia’s security and that the war in Ukraine is necessary to protect Russian interests. In general, Putin has created a narrative that portrays Russia as the victim and Ukraine as the aggressor. This makes it difficult to rally public support for diplomatic solutions and undermines the effectiveness of international pressure on Russia.

In conclusion, the war in Ukraine has been a significant challenge for the international community, with Putin’s imperialistic agenda and cruelty towards Ukrainian people being key factors that have made diplomatic efforts ineffective. The historical context of the conflict, as well as Putin’s propaganda, have further complicated the situation. Despite the efforts of the international community to stop the war through diplomatic means and international laws, Russia has largely ignored these efforts, undermining the authority of international laws and institutions. This highlights the need for stronger international institutions and legal frameworks to prevent similar violations in the future. Ultimately, the conflict in Ukraine remains a tragic reminder of the devastating consequences of unchecked aggression and the importance of upholding the rule of law in promoting peace and security in the world.

Paulina Buzaite is a recent graduate of George Mason University with a degree in Government and International Politics. Prior to her studies in the United States, she completed a law degree in Lithuania. She has held an internship at the Embassy of Lithuania in Washington D.C., a teaching position at a Lithuanian-American school, and currently works as a paralegal.

WORKS CITED

Borrell, Josep. “One Year of War against Ukraine: Acting Together to Ensure International Law Will Prevail.” EEAS, www.eeas.europa.eu/delegations/argentina/one-year-war-against-ukraine-acting-together-ensure-international-law-will_en?s=190. Accessed 14 May 2023.

Courtney, William. “What Does Russia’s War on Ukraine Mean for the International Order?” RAND Corporation, 2 Mar. 2023, www.rand.org/blog/2023/03/what-does-russias-war-on-ukraine-mean-for-the-international.html.

Feroci, Ferdinando Nelli. “Diplomacy and the War against Ukraine.” IAI Istituto Affari Internazionali, 21 Feb. 2023, www.iai.it/en/pubblicazioni/diplomacy-and-war-against-ukraine.

Fishman , Mikhail. “The Price Putin Is Ready to Pay.” Wilson Center, www.wilsoncenter.org/blog-post/price-putin-ready-pay. Accessed 14 May 2023.

Hathaway, Oona A. “How Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine Tested the International Legal Order.” Brookings, 3 Apr. 2023, www.brookings.edu/on-the-record/how-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-tested-the-international-legal-order/. 

Pazzanese, Christina. “As Fighting in Ukraine Intensifies, Analysts Weigh Chances of Regime Change.” Harvard Gazette, 10 Mar. 2023, news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2023/03/as-fighting-in-ukraine-intensifies-analysts-weigh-chances-of-regime-change/.

Weiner, Allen. “Stanford’s Allen Weiner on Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine and the Laws of War.” Stanford Law School, law.stanford.edu/2023/02/21/stanfords-allen-weiner-on-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-and-the-laws-of-war/. Accessed 14 May 2023.


[1] Fishman , Mikhail. “The Price Putin Is Ready to Pay.” Wilson Center, www.wilsoncenter.org/blog-post/price-putin-ready-pay. Accessed 14 May 2023.

[2] Pazzanese, Christina. “As Fighting in Ukraine Intensifies, Analysts Weigh Chances of Regime Change.” Harvard Gazette, 10 Mar. 2023, news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2023/03/as-fighting-in-ukraine-intensifies-analysts-weigh-chances-of-regime-change/.

[3] Feroci, Ferdinando Nelli. “Diplomacy and the War against Ukraine.” IAI Istituto Affari Internazionali, 21 Feb. 2023, www.iai.it/en/pubblicazioni/diplomacy-and-war-against-ukraine.

[4] Borrell, Josep. “One Year of War against Ukraine: Acting Together to Ensure International Law Will Prevail.” EEAS, www.eeas.europa.eu/delegations/argentina/one-year-war-against-ukraine-acting-together-ensure-international-law-will_en?s=190. Accessed 14 May 2023.

[5]Hathaway, Oona A. “How Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine Tested the International Legal Order.” Brookings, 3 Apr. 2023, www.brookings.edu/on-the-record/how-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-tested-the-international-legal-order/.  

[6] Weiner, Allen. “Stanford’s Allen Weiner on Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine and the Laws of War.” Stanford Law School, law.stanford.edu/2023/02/21/stanfords-allen-weiner-on-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-and-the-laws-of-war/. Accessed 14 May 2023.

[7] Courtney, William. “What Does Russia’s War on Ukraine Mean for the International Order?” RAND Corporation, 2 Mar. 2023, www.rand.org/blog/2023/03/what-does-russias-war-on-ukraine-mean-for-the-international.html.

SAKHRI Mohamed
SAKHRI Mohamed

I hold a bachelor's degree in political science and international relations as well as a Master's degree in international security studies, alongside a passion for web development. During my studies, I gained a strong understanding of key political concepts, theories in international relations, security and strategic studies, as well as the tools and research methods used in these fields.

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